Tips for Motorcycle Commuting

The great thing about motorcycle commuting is that you get to add at least two motorcycle rides to every work day, plus the bonus of occasional head-clearing rides during your lunch hour. But riding to and from work on two wheels is demanding. Riderstaffers commute every day and we deal with rush-hour traffic, gridlocked freeways, frenetic city streets and crowded parking lots, as well as occasional close calls, bouts of bad weather, flat tires, unexpectedly empty gas tanks and—mercifully rare—accidents.

1) Stick Out Like a Sore Thumb

Commuting is not the time to try and look cool in your black leather jacket and matte-black helmet, which makes you all but invisible to today’s distracted, smartphone-addicted drivers. The smart move is to make yourself as conspicuous as possible, and one of the best ways to do that is to wear hi-viz apparel.

2) Dress Like a Spaceman

Road warriors should never go into battle without their armor. Adhere to ATGATT (All The Gear, All The Time) and wear a full-face helmet, armored jacket and pants, gloves and boots.

Car Colour Popularity

The most popular car colours today are shades of grey: white, black, grey and silver, amounting to over 70% of the total world car production. Red, blue and brown/beige cars range between 6% and 9% each, while all other colours amount to less than 5%. Colour choice is subject to fluctuation and fashion, and historical trends shifted from dark neutral colours of early cars, through more vivid colours of 1950s and 1960s, back towards today’s neutral colours.

A 2013 poll for Forbes by iSeeCars.com discovered gender differences in preferred car colours. Slightly more men than women preferred red, while slightly more women than men favoured silver. This small but statistically real gender difference, rather than reflecting actual gendered colour preferences, instead appears to be the result of existing gender-based preferences for particular types of car, which are likewise associated with different colours. Each vehicle category, from electric cars to gigantic SUVs, exhibits a general “personality,” which tends to inspire different levels of interest for men and women.

The car colours silver, white, grey, black, gold, beige, and several shades of brown, while each having experienced the intermittent prominence typical of non-neutrals, are likewise subject to fashion’s more general fluctuations.

Electric Car

An electric car is an automobile that is propelled by one or more electric motors, using electrical energy stored in rechargeable batteries. The first practical electric cars were produced in the 1880s. Electric cars were popular in the late 19th century and early 20th century, until advances in internal combustion engines, electric starters in particular, and mass production of cheaper gasoline vehicles led to a decline in the use of electric drive vehicles.

Since 2008, a renaissance in electric vehicle manufacturing has occurred due to advances in batteries, concerns about increasing oil prices, and the desire to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Several national and local governments have established tax credits, subsidies, and other incentives to promote the introduction and now adoption in the mass market of new electric vehicles depending on battery size and their all-electric range.

Compared with cars with internal combustion (IC) engines, electric cars are quieter and have no tailpipe emissions. When recharged by low-emission electrical power sources, electric vehicles can reduce greenhouse gas emissions compared to IC engines. Where oil is imported, use of electric vehicles can reduce imports.

Recharging can take a long time and in many places there

Motorcycle Gear

Here’s the info you need to make smart decisions, to be more comfortable, safer and, hopefully, save some money in the process. On a motorcycle, you’re going to be traveling much faster. Even around town you’ll be hitting 50 mph or more and, on the highway, you may find yourself exceeding 85 mph. Your skin, bones and organs were not designed to withstand impacts at those speeds.

Then there’s the question of abrasion. As a general rule of thumb, figuring the average road surface, you can expect to lose one millimeter of flesh for every mile per hour you’re going over 30 when you crash. No, we don’t know why the thumb mixed empirical and metric units. So, at the top speed of that horse, you’ll have lost 1.4cm (or more than half an inch) of skin and muscle.  Gear can even help when it’s hot, by better allowing your body’s natural evaporative cooling effect to take place. Under constant wind blast, the sweat is blown off your skin too quickly for it to have a cooling effect. Put on a (summer) jacket, helmet, boots, gloves and pants, however, and your body is free to cool itself as

Reasons Ride a Motorcycle

1. Riding A Motorcycle Makes You Cool

Generally, we like to hide this fact. But, in many ways, it’s at the heart of all other reasons: In some way or another motorcycling will make you cooler than everyone else. And deep in their hearts, everyone else will know it.

2. You’ll Find Your Zen

Part of being cool as a motorcyclist comes when you stop worrying about “embarrassing” things like helmet hair or walking into restaurants wearing base layers; you don’t get upset when it’s hot or cold or raining or windy. Ride regularly (and intelligently) for long enough and you’ll even be less enraged by other road users’ negligence. Because you know centering your anger on one person or thing only results in lost awareness.

3. Commuting is Easier and More Fun

It seems a lot of people suffer a mental block when it comes to honestly considering motorcycles as viable everyday transportation, but the fact is, they make a lot of sense. If you live in one of the majority of places in the world that allow lane splitting, riding a motorcycle means you will get to work sooner and with

Machine

A machine is a tool containing one or more parts that transforms energy. Machines are usually powered by chemical, thermal, or electrical means, and are often motorized. Historically, a power tool also required moving parts to classify as a machine. However, the advent of electronics has led to the development of power tools without moving parts that are considered machines. A simple machine is a device that simply transforms the direction or magnitude of a force, but a large number of more complex machines exist. Examples include vehicles, electronic systems, molecular machines, computers, television, and radio.

Perhaps the first example of a human made device designed to manage power is the hand axe, made by chipping flint to form a wedge. A wedge is a simple machine that transforms lateral force and movement of the tool into a transverse splitting force and movement of the workpiece. The idea of a simple machine originated with the Greek philosopher Archimedes around the 3rd century BC, who studied the Archimedean simple machines: lever, pulley, and screw. He discovered the principle of mechanical advantage in the lever. Later Greek philosophers defined the classic five simple machines (excluding the inclined plane) and were able to roughly calculate their mechanical advantage. Heron of Alexandria (ca. 10–75 AD) in his work Mechanics lists five mechanisms that can “set a load in motion”; lever, windlass, pulley, wedge, and screw, and describes their fabrication and uses. However

World Car

The phrase world car is an engineering strategy used to describe an automobile designed to suit the needs of global automotive markets with minimal changes in each market it is sold in. The goal of a world car program is to save costs and increase quality by standardizing parts and design for a single vehicle in a certain class, in hopes of using the cost savings to deliver a higher-quality product that appeals to automotive consumers worldwide. Examples include the Ford Mondeo and Focus, modern no-frills cars such as the Fiat Palio, Dacia Logan and VW Fox along with luxury cars such as the BMW 3-Series and Lexus LS.

In the pioneering days of the automotive industry, automobiles were primarily designed for the local market that the manufacturer was based in, such as the Ford Model T, which was engineered to cope with the rural lifestyle and rugged terrain that most automobile buyers in the United States had to contend with in the early days of the automobile. However, the Model T was arguably the first world car, with knock-down kits being assembled in locations such as Canada, England and Argentina.

In particular, Ford Motor Company and its American compatriot, General Motors were focused on expanding globally, with General Motors either acquiring or partnering with local automobile manufacturers, such as Opel of Germany, Vauxhall of England and Holden of Australia, while Ford created

Car Finance

The subject of car finance comprises the different financial products which allows someone to acquire a car with any arrangement other than a single lump payment. The provision of car finance by a third party supplier allows the acquirer to provide for and raise the funds to compensate the initial owner, either a dealer or manufacturer. Car finance is required by both private individuals and businesses. All types of finance products are available to either sector, however the market share by finance type for each sector differs, partly because business contract hire can provide tax and cashflow benefits to businesses.

Personal Car Finance is a complete subsector of personal finance, with numerous different products available. These include a straightforward car loan, hire purchase, personal contract hire (car leasing) and personal contract purchase. Therefore, car finance includes but is not limited to vehicle leasing. These different types of car finance are possible because of the high residual value of cars and the second hand car market, which enables other forms of financing beyond pure unsecured loans. Car finance arose because the price of cars was out of the reach of individual purchasers without borrowing the money. The funding for personal car finance is provided either by

Automotive Industry

The automotive industry is a wide range of companies and organizations involved in the design, development, manufacturing, marketing, and selling of motor vehicles, some of them are called automakers. The automotive industry is a wide range of companies and organizations involved in the design, development, manufacturing, marketing, and selling of motor vehicles. It is one of the world’s most important economic sectors by revenue. It is one of the world’s most important economic sectors by revenue. The automotive industry does not include industries dedicated to the maintenance of automobiles following delivery to the end-user, such as automobile repair shops and motor fuel filling stations. The term automotive was created from Greek autos (self), and Latin motivus (of motion) to represent any form of self-powered vehicle. This term was proposed by Elmer Sperry.  The automotive industry began in the 1890s with hundreds of manufacturers that pioneered the horseless carriage.  For many decades, the United States led the world in total automobile production.  In 1929, before the Great Depression, the world had 32,028,500 automobiles in use, and the U.S. automobile industry produced over 90% of them. At that time the U.S. had one car per 4.87 persons. After World War II, the U.S. produced about 75 percent of world’s auto production. In 1980, the U.S. was overtaken by Japan and became world’s leader again in 1994. In 2006, Japan narrowly passed the U.S. in production  and

Flight Dynamics

Flight dynamics is the study of the performance, stability, and control of vehicles flying through the air or in outer space. It is concerned with how forces acting on the vehicle influence its speed and attitude with respect to time. In fixed-wing aircraft, the changing orientation of the vehicle with respect to the local air flow is represented by two critical parameters, angle of attack (“alpha”) and angle of sideslip (“beta”). These angles describe the vector direction of airspeed, important because they are the principal source of modulations in the aerodynamic forces and moments applied to the aircraft.

Spacecraft flight dynamics involve three forces: propulsive (rocket engine), gravitational, and lift and drag (when traveling through the earth’s or any other atmosphere). Because aerodynamic forces involved with spacecraft flight are very small, this leaves gravity as the dominant force. Aircraft and spacecraft share a critical interest in their orientation with respect to the earth horizon and heading, and this is represented by another set of angles, “yaw”, “pitch”, and “roll”, which angles match their colloquial meaning, but also have formal definition as an Euler sequence. These angles are the product of the rotational equations of motion, where orientation responds to torque, just as the velocity

Analysis of Disc Brake Rotors

disc brake is a type of brake that uses calipers to squeeze pairs of pads against a rotor in order to create friction that retards the rotation of a shaft, such as a vehicle axle, either to reduce its rotational speed or to hold it stationary. The energy of motion is converted into waste heat which must be dispersed. Hydraulic disc brakes are the most commonly used form of brake for motor vehicles but the principles of a disc brake are applicable to almost any rotating shaft. Compared to drum brakes, disc brakes offer better stopping performance because the disc is more readily cooled. As a consequence discs are less prone to the brake fade caused when brake components overheat. Disc brakes also recover more quickly from immersion. Most drum brake designs have at least one leading shoe, which gives a servo-effect. By contrast, a disc brake has no self-servo effect and its braking force is always proportional to the pressure placed on the brake pad by the braking system via any brake servo, braking pedal, or lever. This tends to give the driver better “feel” and helps to avoid impending lockup. Drums are also prone to “bell mouthing” and trap worn lining material within the assembly, both causes of various braking problems.

The rotor is usually made

Manufacturing System

A flexible manufacturing system (FMS) is a manufacturing system in which there is some amount of flexibility that allows the system to react in case of changes, whether predicted or unpredicted. This flexibility is generally considered to fall into two categories, which both contain numerous subcategories. The first category, machine flexibility, covers the system’s ability to be changed to produce new product types, and ability to change the order of operations executed on a part. The second category is called routing flexibility, which consists of the ability to use multiple machines to perform the same operation on a part, as well as the system’s ability to absorb large-scale changes, such as in volume, capacity, or capability.

Most FMS consist of three main systems. The work machines which are often automated CNC machines are connected by a material handling system to optimize parts flow and the central control computer which controls material movements and machine flow. The main advantages of an FMS is its high flexibility in managing manufacturing resources like time and effort in order to manufacture a new product. The best application of an FMS is found in the production of small sets of products like those from a mass production.

An Industrial Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS) consists of robots, Computer-controlled

High Performance EMC

C P Wong is the Charles Smithgall Institute Endowed Chair and Regents’ Professor at Georgia Institute of Technology, and Dean of Engineering at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He received his primary and secondary education in Hong Kong and furthered his education in the US. He received his BS degree from Purdue University, and PhD degree from the Pennsylvania State University. He received many awards, among those, the AT&T Bell Labs Fellow Award in 1992, the IEEE CPMT Society Outstanding Sustained Technical Contributions Award in 1995, the Georgia Tech Sigma Xi Faculty Best Research Paper Award in 1999, Best MS, PhD and Undergraduate Thesis Awards in 2002 and 2004, respectively, the University Press (London) Award of Excellence, the IEEE Third Millennium Medal in 2000. His research interests lie in the fields of polymeric materials, electronic packaging and interconnect, interfacial adhesions, nano-functional material syntheses, Si etching and energy storage. His work includes nano-composites such as well-aligned carbon nanotubes, graphenes, lead-free alloys, flip chip underfill, ultra high k capacitor composites superhydrophobic coatings and supercapacitors. He holds over 65 US patents, numerous international patents, has published over 1000 technical papers, 12 books. He is a Member of the National Academy

Design of Composite Leaf Spring

Reducing weight while increasing or maintaining strength of products is getting to be highly important research issue in this modern world. The suspension system in a vehicle significantly affects the behavior of vehicle i.e., vibration characteristics including ride comfort, stability etc. Leaf springs are commonly used in the vehicle suspension system and are subjected to millions of varying stress cycles leading to fatigue failure. A lot of research has been done for improving the performance of leaf spring. Now the automobile industry has shown interest in the replacement of steel spring with composite leaf spring. In general, it is found that fiberglass material has better strength characteristic and lighter in weight as compare to steel for leaf spring. In this research work the author has reviewed some papers on the design and analysis leaf spring performance and fatigue life prediction of leaf spring. There is also the analysis of failure in leaf spring. The automakers can reduce product development cost and time while improving the safety, comfort and durability of the vehicles they produce. The predictive capability of CAE tools has progressed to the point where much of the design verification is now done using computer simulation rather

Automotive Engineering

Automobile engineering, along with aerospace engineering and marine engineering, is a branch of vehicle engineering, incorporating elements of mechanical, electrical, electronic, software and safety engineering as applied to the design, manufacture and operation of motorcycles, automobiles and trucks and their respective engineering subsystems. It also includes modification of vehicles. Manufacturing domain deals with the creation and assembling the whole parts of automobiles is also included in it.The automotive engineering field is research -intensive and involves direct application of mathematical models and formulas. The study of automotive engineering is to design, develop, fabricate, and testing vehicles or vehicle components from the concept stage to production stage. Production, development, and manufacturing are the three major functions in this field.

Automobile Engineering is mainly divided into three streams such as production or design engineering focuses on design components, testing of parts, coordinating tests, and system of a vehicle.

Automobile Engineering

Automobile Engineering is a branch study of engineering which teaches manufacturing, designing, mechanical mechanisms as well operations of automobiles. It is an introduction to vehicle engineering which deals with motorcycles, cars, buses trucks etc. It includes branch study of mechanical, electronic, software and safety elements. Some of the engineering attributes and disciplines that are of importance to the automotive engineer and many

Technology Forecast

Transport sector has an important contribution on global carbon emission. In EU, Transport sector is the second most greenhouse gases emitting sector with 24.3%. Therefore, major car manufacturing countries have declared special regulations and objectives in order to decrease these high emission ratios. EU regulation requires fleets to have 95 g CO2/km cap by 2020. US and Japan has also challenging targets. These targets can only be achieved by partial introduction of electric vehicles to fleets. For this reason, most major manufacturers have already introduced their electric vehicle cars, and they have plans to develop further.

The countries have set some objectives to achieve for electric vehicle market. However, in most cases, these objectives are revised when the deadlines come closer. In 2011 US has put an objective of reaching 1 million electric vehicles by 2015. However, the total of all the electric vehicles according to the report of IEA in 2015 is 665,000. The numbers and range is also very different between different research companies. 2020 estimation for market share of electric vehicles changes from 2% to 25% according to different research organizations.

An important reason for such wide range of estimation and discrepancies on achievement of objectives

Energy Buffer for Electric Vehicles

Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV) is considered as an important mobility option for reducing the dependence of fossil fuels. After almost a decade after the first serial production electric vehicle launched by Tesla the main auto manufacturers have already claimed their plans and readiness for delivering their electric products to customers. The greatest challenge of the BEV is the battery itself, as they face the customers accustomed to the flexibility of oil derivatives usage. Electric batteries offer either high specific energy capacity to cover acceptable mileage or high specific power to follow typical driving discharge/ charge cycle demands, but not both. Hybridization of the energy source is one widespread nowadays solution and a common strategy would be to combine an electric battery with an additional high-power source usually mechanical devices as kinetic energy storage – flywheels (KES), or electrical device – super-capacitors, for example. Based on its utilization in F1 competition KES systems gain popularity and there are signs from automakers for introducing the KES into mass production.

In spite of some claims that KES technology is immature for BEV applications, nowadays power electronics technology allows KES integration in BEV. A two-power level electric driveline for vehicle application with KES utilization as

F-N-R gearbox with spur-gear differential

A differential is a gear train with three shafts that has the property that the angular velocity of one shaft is the average of the angular velocities of the others, or a fixed multiple of that average. In automobiles and other wheeled vehicles, the differential allows the outer drive wheel to rotate faster than the inner drive wheel during a turn. This is necessary when the vehicle turns, making the wheel that is traveling around the outside of the turning curve roll farther and faster than the other. The average of the rotational speed of the two driving wheels equals the input rotational speed of the drive shaft. An increase in the speed of one wheel is balanced by a decrease in the speed of the other. When used in this way, a differential couples the input shaft (or prop shaft) to the pinion, which in turn runs on the ring gear of the differential. This also works as reduction gearing. On rear wheel drive vehicles the differential may connect to half-shafts inside an axle housing, or drive shafts that connect to the rear driving wheels. Front wheel drive vehicles tend to have the pinion on the end of the main-shaft of the gearbox and the differential

Pedestrian Headforms

Used for pedestrian safety testing, Diversified Technical Systems’ (Seal Beach, CA) pedestrian headforms (which emulate a human head) embedded data acquisition solution are instrumented with a triaxial accelerometer and miniature SLICE NANO data recorder inside and then launched at a vehicle’s hood and windshield to test for potential injuries that may be sustained by pedestrians. DTS’ three-channel SLICE NANO miniature data recorder with 16 GB flash memory offers a cable-free solution for both the 4.5 kg (9.9 lb) “adult” and the 3.5 kg (7.7 lb) “child” headform. The mounting block also houses a DTS ACC3 PRO triaxial accelerometer, which has a mass of 2000 g (70 oz), that measures the linear acceleration and impact forces. Options are also available for other sensor models. “The DAS and sensors are all inside so there are no cables to get tangled up when it’s launched at the car. That also helps with repeatability—something that’s especially important for regulation testing,” said Scott Pruitt, DTS president and co-founder.

Features pedestrian facility include:

  • Equipment and software developed in-house for targeting and aligning the headform which ensures every impact is exactly where it is supposed to be, well within the permitted tolerance.
  • An accurate independent measurement

Vehicle Connectivity

Automotive suppliers and companies from other fields are jockeying to team up with the right group of partners to provide services for connected vehicles and smart cities. The collaborations cross boundaries to include insurance companies, app providers and public services as well as a range technology suppliers. Connected vehicles are rapidly moving into the mainstream, putting pressure on companies to figure out what services and features they want to offer. App companies, cellular and satellite providers, insurance companies, data centers and service providers are all struggling to cash in on the connected car boom. Communication companies like Ericsson are attempting to help vehicle owners find the apps and services they need. Ericsson created a center for app and service providers.

Automakers also detailed the need for multiple partnerships, which are often called an “ecosystem,” during the 2017 TU-Automotive Detroit conference. These ecosystems build upon alliances that have been established in recent years. Consumers who spend much of their time connected to the Web are pressing automakers to provide far-ranging amenities. Today’s technology lets service providers offer a broad range of offerings, making it difficult to determine what users might want and how they can earn revenue. For